Friday, July 21, 2017

A Great New Discovery

Friday, July 21, 2017
Sunny with Blue Skies
28 C  83 F



A Great New Discovery

   I received an e-mail about 6 weeks ago. It was from Mr. Greg Hickey, who had this wonderful  toy that was an electromagnet steam shovel iron mover. In place of the normal scoop or shovel, there was an electromagnetic for attaching iron  to be moved by the steam shovel. It was a great new discovery, and the name of the manufacturer was  the A.C.Redmond Company, in  Flint, Michigan (USA).  

 In Greg's Own Words:

Stacey , hope these pictures are better for you to use. If you need more or different parts shot will be glad to try. I bought the crane in a antique store in St Louis Mo. I had never heard of the company , so I thought I would take a chance was purchased in 2011. I don't think the wiring is original, I also question the tube that would have held what looks like D batteries. The line that raises and lowers the magnet looks original. The measurements I took are , swing deck "bottom of the cab" 7 1/2 inches wide , length is 12 1/4 to 12 1/2 inches , hard to measure back end has a curve out, point of boom 16 inches, length of boom 18 inches . The crawler frame is 4 7/8 inches x 9 inches long . The roof is 13 inches long  7 1/2 inches wide measuring straight across the bottom of roof. Length of the house is 11 1/2 inches width 6 1/2 inches , the side of house is close to 5 1/2 inches. The magnet is 2 3/4 inches. The wheels are 2 inch high  by 1 1/2 wide. I'm going to send pictures in a separate file . You can use ,edit pictures however you need to . 
Thank  You, Greg

Greg does not know much about this toy, so I naturally asked him to send me photos in order to perhaps have someone provide more information about this magnificent toy.  For those who might not know, Flint, Michigan  is a city famous for manufacturing cars in the USA by the 3 major American manufacturers.












I congratulated Greg on his excellent photography. The photographs illustrate all of the different sides of the toy, as well as the boom and the electromagnetic magnet. Hopefully, this being a somewhat old toy from I would guess the 1940's-1950's or even earlier, someone out there who reads my blog will be able to help us out.

So if someone has the same toy out there, and knows more about the A.C.Redmond Company, would you please write to me,so that we can give readers more information about this newfound toy company.

Thanks for dropping by,
And as always,
Have a great day or night,
Wherever you may be.

Stacey Bindman
Toysearcher@gmail.com



Monday, July 17, 2017

The Ives, Blakeslee & Williams Company

Monday, July 17, 2017
Overcast with rain forecast
20 C  68 F

The Ives, Blakeslee
& Williams Company

   A reader wrote to me last week asking if I had more scanned photos of an Ives, Blakeslee & Williams Company catalogue. He had visited my blog, and had found 3 posts on the company . I had written 3 posts about the American toy distributor company on September 30, 2016. I hadn't scanned the catalogue, but for a selection of images from the catalogue. The catalogue that I have is a June 1965 reprint of the Original 1893 catalogue ( 124 years ago).

  I didn't have the entire catalogue scanned, so I decided to scan it. I then contacted the reader to say that I scanned the entire catalogue, and if he wanted the catalogue, I'd send him a DVD with  all of the pages. All he had to do is send me his address. The reader had just started to collect mechanical toys, and was interested in further becoming more knowledgeable about old toys.

  The catalogue is a cornucopia of all kinds of toys and playthings that would have been around in the 1890's. Most, if not all of the toys are "hand-on" toys that would be played with indoors or outdoors.  THere are other interesting toys that I did not include in the 10 photos that I selected. There were model steam engines, fireworks, batteries, cameras,toy steam engine attachments, and fireworks. What's interesting is that there are no warnings in the catalogue to warn children and their parents to be careful when playing with these toys. Steam engines produce scalding steam heat, and fireworks, of course could be explosive and dangerous. Perhaps there were written instructions and cautionary notes included with the toys.

  What especially interesting to not  are the p[rices of these wholesale toys. The  mechanical locomotives below are sold by the dozen for the piece of $ 24.00 (U.S.) for 12\, while the Montauk toy guns are sold for $ 9.00 (U.S.) per gross (144 pieces).











    So that's it for this overcast and potential raining day of July 17, 2017. This spring and Summer have not been the best of seasons. We've has lots of cloudy and rainy days here in Montreal. I have a small piece of land that I rent out from my city, and I grow vegetables. I hardly have to visit it, because of the  amount of rain that has fallen. Of course, I shouldn't complain. On the west coast of Canada, in the province of British Columbia, the weather has been sunny and hot, and dry! As a consequence, there have been major forest fires, and evacuations of cities to protect the people. I hope the weather will improve for August and September, but we can only hope.

Thanks for dropping by,
And as always,
Have a great part of the day or night,
Wherever you may be.

Stacey Bindman
Toysearcher@gmail.com






Monday, July 10, 2017

Can you Identify These Toy Soldiers?

Monday, July 10, 2017
Cloudy with Sun
23C  74 F


Can You Identify 
These Toy Soldiers?


   I always like to receive e-mail from readers. The main reason is that I know people are reading my blog. The second reason is that it keeps me busy, in being able to write an interesting new post.
I  received an e-mail 2 weeks ago, and today, I received photos for toy soldiers that I do not know about. Mr. William Hones sent me these nice photos of his toy soldiers and asked me if I knew who made them. I'm not very knowledgeable about toy soldiers, but I do know that lots of people collect and enjoy them. There are British and AMerican-made toy soldiers, although you can in fact find toy soldiers made all over the world.  So if someone knows who manufactured these soldiers, would you please send me an e-mail, and I'll inform William as to their manufacturer's identity.











So that's it for today, and I do hope that someone out there will be 
able to identify these wonderful toy soldiers.

Thanks for dropping by,
And as always,
Have a great part of the day or night,
Wherever you may be.

Stacey Bindman
Toysearcher@gmail.com








Monday, July 3, 2017

Bertoia Auctions Find of a Rare Mechanical Bank

July 1, 2017
Overcast and Raining
23 C  74 F


Bertoia Auctions Find of 
a Rare Mechnical Bank


Description

J. & E. Stevens Co., c 1880's, made of cast iron with a painted lead goat on top, by placing a coin on the goat's tail and turning the faucet, this allows figure to deposit coin and seemingly present the depositor with a stein of beer, very attractive in scarcer painted barrel scheme colours and a very strong conditioned goat. Tip of one horn reattached, tin trap replaced, otherwise all original in (Excellent  Condition) as found in a Virginia attic.










Well, this mechanical bank is certainly rarer and interesting.
The final bidding price was estimated between $ 15,000 - $ 25,000 US.
The final price was $ 51,000 - Wow!


Thanks for dropping by,
And as always,
Have a great part of the day or night,
Wherever you may be.

Stacey Bindman
Toysearcher@gmail.com





Wednesday, June 21, 2017

The Master Toymaker Sends me Photos of Another Toy

Thursday, June 22, 2017
Sunny with Clouds
25 C  77 F

The Master Toymaker Sends me
Photos of Another Toy


Christopher Ferrone

     If you follow my blog, you will recognize the name of Mr. Christopher Ferrone. He's the president of  a company called Americoach Systems, Inc in Chicago, Illinois.The company is invoked in Specialized Transport Technology, safety, management and logistics.

    I don't know where Christopher finds the time to make his wonderful toys when he is the President of a company, but he does. He's quite a craftsman, and he manages to find old toys to make his unique "newer" toys. 

   The photo below illustrates the unfinished parts of this steam-shovel. The truck is a  Ty-nee-tot,
while the steam shovel component is from a Structo toy. Both are from the 1940's. Chris also made some new parts for his composite brand-new steam-shovel truck.

   Chris must have  a great tool are and presses in order to make his toys. I even wonder if he works on his large-sized "real" coaches.

    I've paraphrased (rewrote Chris's words)  below:

THe boom has a hand crank to move the shovel up and down. This is not how the original toy was made. The rear stabilizers are also made, and are a modern-era component. The roof winch is from an old tow truck for the boom control for the boom control and for the payout (I assume "payout" means the unloading of the contents of the bucket).


Below is a photo of the finished toy. It certainly is beautiful, and still maintains an old look to it.

The image below is a well-taken photograph. It
illustrates how the shovel and bucket work to open the bucket to unload its' payload.


Below is an even better photograph.
 You can tell from the front of the truck that it is from around the late 1930's-early 1950's. Chris knows his toys, and informed me that both toys are from the 1930's.

Below: A nice close-up photo of  working mechanism for cranking the bucket up and down.
Below: 
A nice side view of the finished toy

If you search looking for Christopher Ferrone's name, you'll find his other fine toys that he has made over the years. It's always a pleasure to receive these "surprises", and to call Chris, a friend.

Thanks for dropping by,
and as always,
Have a great part of the day or night,
Wherever you may be.


 Stacey Bindman
Toysearcher@gmail.com




A New Reader Writes Me Again

Tuesday, June 21, 2017
Cloud with Sun
16 C  61 F



A New Reader Writes Me Again

 


 I'm always happy to  receive mail  from readers. And so it was with Mr. Ezra Walker.  He had found a very small toy car at a tag sale, and wanted to know if I could help him identify the toy. I couldn't but informed him that I would write a post with his permission. 

   The toy is  1 1/2" (37mm) and Ezra estimated the approximate hers of the toy to be around the 1920's-1930's. I'll have to ask Ezra what the toy is made from, but to me it looks like lead, since there are a lot of dents and bends that appear similar to lead when you bend or dent it.







      So that's it for  today, and I hope someone will help identify this small toy.

Thanks for dropping by,
And as always,
Have a great part of the day or night,
Wherever you may be.

Stacey Bindman
Toysearcher@gmail.com